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BLOG — saponification

How to prepare your hair for the transition to natural haircare 🌿

How to prepare your hair for the transition to natural haircare 🌿
You’ve finally made the choice to go natural with your haircare but you’re still unsure what this will mean for you. So we thought we’d pull together all of the information we have on making the transition to natural haircare.

Why using a pH balanced shampoo isn't always a good thing...

Why using a pH balanced shampoo isn't always a good thing...

In the shampoo and soap world, there is a lot of talk about pH. But most commonly bars and liquids are referred to as being pH balanced. And what exactly does this mean? To be pH neutral a product must be sitting smack bang the middle of the pH scale which is approximately 7. It means simply that the product is not too alkaline or not too acidic. Water sits at 7 with milk as a 6 and egg as an 8.  More and more we’re seeing products being marketed as pH balanced and this supposed to be a good...


What does 'saponification' mean in natural shampoo bar making?

What does 'saponification' mean in natural shampoo bar making?
In short, saponification is defined by Merriam-Webster as the act, process, or result of making soap: conversion into soap’. In order to achieve a solid bar of soap, you will need to mix fats and oils with a sodium or potassium hydroxide. 
The other incredibly important thing to consider is that shampoo/soap bars that do not contain sodium hydroxide/caustic soda/lye are not natural. These are what are referred to as syndet bars, we’ve written extensively about the difference between natural and syndet bars here. Moreover, the word syndet is derived from the words synthetic and detergent.